Speakers’ details


Speakers | Talks per Track | Talks per Session | Monday 21/10 | Tuesday 22/10 | Wednesday 23/10

Allard Buijze

AxonIQ

Allard Buijze is Founder and CTO at AxonIQ with a solid software development background. Starting at the age of 6, he has developed a great passion for programming and has guided both large and small organizations in building performant and scalable applications. Allard likes to help customers make appropriate future-proof, technical decisions. As a former software architect specializing within the field of "scalability" and "high performance" computing, he has worked on several small and large projects, where performance and complexity were recurring themes. Allard is convinced that a good domain model is the beginning of contributing to the overall performance of an application. From this conviction, he has developed the Axon Framework. Allard has given several trainings in the areas of scalable architectures, test driven development, application design and clean coding. He strongly believes that good craftsmanship can only be achieved through continuous and intensive exchange of experience with others. The last years, he has been investigating and applying CQRS to a number of projects. As a result, he created the Axon Framework, an open source Java framework that helps developers create scalable and extensible applications. Axon has a growing community and has already been successfully introduced in several high-profile projects around the world.

Event-Driven Microservices, the Sense, the Non-sense and a Way Forward

Conference
Microservice Architecture

Microservices, and especially their Event-Driven variants, are at the very peak of the hype cycle and, according to some, on their way down. Meanwhile, a large number of success stories and failures have been shared about this architectural style. How do we ensure that we don't throw away the baby with the bathwater and end up re-inventing the same concepts again a decade from now? In this talk, I want to zoom in on different aspects around microservices. What are the promises made and how did it deliver on those? How did technology surrounding microservices evolve and impact our decisions? Lastly, I will look forward. How can we be pragmatic about microservices, avoiding some of the common pitfalls and helping ensure ourselves that we get the promised benefits, but without the pain.

Scheduled on Monday from 17:15 to 18:00 in Mir

CQRS
Event Sourcing
Messaging
Event-Driven Microservices