MASTERCLASSES

dennissharpe

Dennis Sharpe

Dennis Sharpe

Dennis Sharpe is a software architect and the CTO of Ippon USA with over 20 years experience leading, designing, and coding software applications. He has experience in a variety of different industries including healthcare, federal government, loyalty, marketing, utilities, telecommunications, and financial. He has experience speaking at several conferences and events including DevNexus, DevFest and Java User Groups. He also has experience training and providing technical leadership for hackathons and coding dojos.

BUILDING A MICRO-SERVICES BASED APPLICATION IN A DAY – EMBRACING THE POWER OF jHIPSTER!

JHipster is one of those open-source projects you stumble upon and immediately think, “Of course!” It combines a number of very successful frameworks in web development –  Spring Boot, Angular/React, Docker, Bootstrap – to rapidly create and deploy modern applications. It covers everything from project inception, to entity generation, containerisation and CI/CD configuration. 

JHipster was started by Julien Dubois in October 2013. The first public release (version 0.3.1) was launched December 7, 2013. Since then, the project has had over 115 releases! It is an open-source, Apache 2.0-licensed project on GitHub. It has a core team of 16 developers and over 280 contributors. You can find more information at jhipster.tech.

In this masterclass, you will learn how to harness the power of jHipster to create and deploy a micro-services based application in a day. Bring your laptops!

Price: $799

joshlong

Josh Long

Josh Long

Josh Long is the Spring Developer Advocate at Pivotal. Josh is a Java Champion, author of 5 books (including O’Reilly’s upcoming “Cloud Native Java: Designing Resilient Systems with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud, and Cloud Foundry”) and 3 best-selling video trainings (including “Building Microservices with Spring Boot Livelessons” w/ Phil Webb), and an open-source contributor (Spring Boot, Spring Integration, Spring Cloud, Activiti and Vaadin)

CLOUD NATIVE JAVA

“It is not necessary to change. Survival is not mandatory.” -W. Edwards Deming

Work takes time to flow through an organization and ultimately be deployed to production where it captures value. It’s critical to reduce time-to-production. Software – for many organizations and industries – is a competitive advantage. Organizations break their larger software ambitions into smaller, independently deployable, feature -centric batches of work – microservices. In order to reduce the round-trip between stations of work, organizations collapse or consolidate as much of them as possible and automate the rest; developers and operations beget “devops,” cloud-based services and platforms automate operations work and break down the need for ITIL tickets and change management boards. But velocity, for velocity’s sake, is dangerous. Microservices invite architectural complexity that few are prepared to address. In this talk, we’ll look at how high performance organizations like Ticketmaster, Alibaba, and Netflix make short work of that complexity with Spring Boot and Spring Cloud.

In this masterclass we’ll look at how to build cloud-native Java systems that are elastic, agile, observable and robust.

Price: $799

cartermorgan

Carter Morgan

Carter Morgan

Seldomly Helpful. Occasionally Hilarious. Public Speaker and Standup Comedian.

KUBERNETES

In the last decade, user demand for always-on applications has grown exponentially. Many developers choose application patterns to meet this need, but what about the infrastructure needed to support these ever-growing demands? In this full-day masterclass, we introduce you to the next level of automation using hands-on examples of industry standard tooling like Docker, a container format, and Kubernetes, as well as best practices for using CI/CD tools like Jenkins and Spinnaker on top of Kubernetes.
The workshop is composed of two parts:
  • Kubernetes 101: Orchestrating the Cloud
    In this part, we cover the basics of modern-day applications and how design patterns like microservices drive the need for more robust infrastructure. Then we cover packaging and distributing apps using Docker. Finally, we up our game to running applications on Kubernetes. By the end of this lesson, you’ll have the knowledge needed to excel at scale.

    • Key takeaways:
      • Provision Kubernetes using Google Container Engine
      • Deploy and manage Docker containers using kubectl
  • Kubernetes in Production with Jenkins & Spinnaker
    In this part, we will learn best practices for using CI/CD tools like Jenkins and Spinnaker on top of Kubernetes, the powerful container automation framework. In this lesson, we’ll cover the basics using namespaces to set up multi-tenant environments, setting up a continuous integration and delivery pipeline on Kubernetes, and more. After this workshop, you’ll be able to apply this knowledge to your own work environment.

    • Key Takeaways:
      • Kubernetes concepts for deploying containerized applications
      • setting up multi-tenant environments
      • continuous integration and delivery pipeline using Jenkins/Spinnaker on Kubernetes

Price: $799

holdenkarau

Holden Karau

Holden Karau

Holden is a transgender Canadian open source developer advocate with a focus on Apache Spark, BEAM, and related “big data” tools. She is the co-author of Learning Spark, High Performance Spark, and another Spark book that’s a bit more out of date. She is a commiter on and PMC member on Apache Spark and committer on SystemML & Mahout projects. Prior to joining Google as a Developer Advocate she worked at IBM, Alpine, Databricks, Google (yes this is her second time), Foursquare, and Amazon. When not in San Francisco, Holden speaks internationally about different big data technologies (mostly Spark). She was tricked into the world of big data while trying to improve search and recommendation systems and has long since forgotten her original goal. Outside of work she enjoys playing with fire, riding scooters, and dancing.

APACHE SPARK

Apache Spark is a fast and general engine for distributed computing & big data processing with APIs in Scala, Java, Python, and R. This tutorial will briefly introduce PySpark (the Python API for Spark) with some hands-on-exercises combined with a quick introduction to Spark’s core concepts. We will cover the obligatory wordcount example which comes in with every big-data tutorial, as well as discuss Spark’s unique methods for handling node failure and other relevant internals. Then we will briefly look at how to access some of Spark’s libraries (like Spark SQL & Spark ML) from Python. While Spark is available in a variety of languages this workshop will be focused on using Spark and Python together and explore a basic machine learning pipeline.
This masterclass is intended for people new to Spark/PySpark, if you have the time to explore beforehand you can install Spark locally or try it on GCP in Dataproc. Attendees will be provided access to a cloud version of Spark for the duration of the workshop so if you don’t have time to set it up in advance don’t worry.

Price: $799

SPEAKERS

heathervancura

Heather VanCura

Heather VanCura

Heather leads the Java Community standardization efforts at Oracle, and is a leader of the global community driven adoption and user group programs. She is Chairperson of the Java Community Process (JCP) program.  In this role she drives the efforts to transform the JCP program and broaden participation and diversity in the community. She is passionate about Java, women in technology and developer communities, serving as an International speaker and community organizer of developer hack days around the world. Heather enjoys speaking at conferences, such as OSCON, FOSDEM, Devoxx, Wonder Women Tech, and the JavaOne Conferences. She resides in the San Francisco Bay Area, California USA and enjoys trying new sports and fitness activities in her free time.

THE FUTURE OF JAVA AND YOU

This session will explore how Java development has been brought into the open over the past decade. Several Java developer efforts have brought open source development processes and new levels of transparency and participation into their communities. The Java Community Process (JCP) program celebrates twenty years of Java standards development in 2018. Since the initiation of efforts to expand the developer participation in the Java community, Java standards development is more open that it ever has been.

Learn how to take part in Java technology evolution through the Java Community Process (JCP) program. You can participate as an individual, corporation, or nonprofit such as a Java user group (JUG). This session answers questions about why and how to participate in the JCP Program. You will also learn about the global Adoption programs and how you can participate in the programs. We will discuss details such as how to run hack days, collaborate with other JUG leads on Adopt-a-JSR activities, and review use cases from other JUGs around the world contributing to the Java EE 8 and Java SE 9 JSRs.

We will explore how far we have come since the inception of Java in the 1990s, as well as the plans made for the near future to bring even greater openness, transparency and participation into the the Java developer community.

jrosenbaum

Jennie Rosenbaum

Jennie Rosenbaum

I am an artist working with 3D modelling, Augmented Reality and Machine Learning. My work explores posthuman and postgender concepts using classical art combined with new media techniques and programming.

I have recently undertaken a masters degree and changed focus to more technologically based digital art using physics based rendering, Deep Neural Networks and Unity to develop an Augmented Reality mobile application.

THE FUTURE OF ART

An exploration of digital art looking at the uses of machine learning and how it impacts the future of art. What is art like when artists and musicians work collaboratively with machines? What can we learn from art created using neural networks and what can we create? From the frivolous to the beautiful, what does art created by computers look like and where can it take us?

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Kristine Howard

Kristine Howard

Kris Howard has been building websites in one form or another for over twenty years. She’s been a developer, a business analyst, and a manager; and most recently wrangled engineers at Canva, one of Australia’s fastest growing startups. She’s now Head of Operations for YOW! Conferences, meeting and working with tech teams around the APAC region.

KNIT ONE, COMPUTE ONE

Can a programming language describe art? Is knitting Turing complete? And just how many bytes of data does the average knitted scarf hold, anyway?

Knitting is inherently binary, so you can use sticks and string to encode data in many ways – like recording the day’s weather, noting enemy troop movements, or even knitting a computer virus. But that’s just the start! A knitter becomes a human CPU, utilising data structures and free memory to implement instructions. Patterns themselves are very similar to computer languages, with new syntax proposals emerging with innovative constructs and even compilers.

If you thought knitting was just an old-fashioned hobby for grandmas, this talk will open your eyes to the many ways this traditional craft is still relevant in the digital age. (And no, you don’t need to know how to knit.)

dennissharpe

Dennis Sharpe

Dennis Sharpe

Dennis Sharpe is a software architect and the CTO of Ippon USA with over 20 years experience leading, designing, and coding software applications. He has experience in a variety of different industries including healthcare, federal government, loyalty, marketing, utilities, telecommunications, and financial. He has experience speaking at several conferences and events including DevNexus, DevFest and Java User Groups. He also has experience training and providing technical leadership for hackathons and coding dojos.

BUILDING A MICROSERVICES APPLICATION WITH JHIPSTER 4 AND DOCKER IN 30 MINUTES

Is it possible to set up a microservices application with a separate functioning front-end in 30 minutes? With JHipster 4 it is! And what you get is fully functional with a service registry that provides scalability and load balancing. Using provided Docker Compose configurations, the entire stack can be run locally without installing anything but Docker. JHipster also includes full monitoring using the ELK stack.

courtneywebster

Courtney Webster

Courtney Webster

Courtney is an unabashed full stack polyglot. She’s worked with a huge variety of systems: frontend user-facing apps and design platforms, domain modelling problems, data migrations, and scaling infrastructure. Also robots this one time. She’s fascinated with breaking down difficult concepts into their fundamental, easily understandable core, and the intersection between technological and human systems. She also likes cats.

MIGRATING THE WORLD’S LARGEST RAILS APP TO KUBERNETES

At Redbubble, our Rails monolith is huge, and the entire company depends on it. It’s (by some metrics) the biggest in the world. And we’re on a mission to migrate this great glorious beast from our legacy platform and into its new home in Kubernetes. How do we deal with more than a decade’s worth of legacy decisions in a sensible way? I’ll tell you about our pains and our triumphs.

We’ve found ways to unravel dependencies so that we can move isolated pieces of our infrastructure one at a time. We’re also working on creating a sensible development environment for our monolith-plus-microservices architecture, and dockerising a HUGE application for production. We’re doing all this while maintaining good communication with the entire rest of our fellow engineers, since all of them are our stakeholders.

I’ll tell you how to migrate a company’s largest asset so smoothly and silently they’ll hardly realise it happened.

cartermorgan

Carter Morgan

Carter Morgan

Seldomly Helpful. Occasionally Hilarious. Public Speaker and Standup Comedian.

ORCHESTRATING THE CLOUD WITH KUBERNETES

After you know the basics of managing containers at scale, what comes next? This talk is all about running applications in production on Kubernetes.

In this talk you will learn:
– How to monitor your cluster
– How to automate deployments with a CI/CD pipeline
– Where Service Meshes and Proxies can help you at scale

shruti

Shruti Kembhavi

Shruti Kembhavi

Automation Specialist @IAG
Currently working on Cloud initiative to build security compliance tools for securing AWS workloads.
Let’s make the Cloud a secure place 🙂

CLOUD SECURITY – WATCHMEN

While public cloud providers like AWS offer cost effectiveness, reliability, scalability and performance; “Security” of data/applications hosted in AWS remains a shared responsibility between the customer and the service provider.
With all the recent well-publicised hacking and malware attacks, IT leaders are very aware of the need for robust cloud security and compliance. Cloud Security is becoming even more important as companies use the public cloud for more mission-critical production applications. Cloud providers like AWS offer an array of security services and tools to secure customer workloads, but the customer (account admin) has to actually implement the necessary defences.

We have developed “Watchmen”, a Cloud auditing tool to help with this aspect of “Security Compliance”. Watchmen ensures that resources running in AWS are monitored and reported on for security compliance policies based on NIST and AWS security best practices like encryption, restricted privileges, cloud trial logging, MFA etc.

Watchmen provides a centralised framework (deployed to a AWS account), which monitors and reports on security compliance for resources/workloads running in multiple AWS accounts (Citizens).
For more details visit our GitHub repo: https://github.com/iagcl/watchmen

In addition, we will also cover useful tools like “Centralised CloudTrail Logging” with Splunk integration which will help companies monitor and analyse logs for multiple AWS accounts.

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Pei Shi Yong

Pei Shi Yong

Pei Shi is a full stack developer, lover of stuffed animals and a hobby seamstress. She hacks on Ruby, JS, and Clojure. She’s an ex-ThoughtWorker and now works for Zendesk munging data to support her fabric addiction

BRINGING PROD HOME

Kubernetes has quickly become one of the most popular container orchestration tools. It provides automated container deployment, scaling, and management. However, dealing with (micro)services during development is still a complex task, especially when you need to spin up many services at any given time. In this talk, I’ll explore some options for sane local development in our containerised world.

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Ronen Narkis

Ronen Narkis

Ronen Narkis has been a pro coder for more than 12 years across a variety of projects ranging from Devops to Bigdata, using Clojure since 2008 to solve real world problems.

He enjoys expanding his knowledge about security, operating systems, programming languages and any other cool tech he can lay his hands on.

RE-OPS, ONE REPL TO RULE THEM ALL

Read eval print loops have been in existence since the early terminals and LISP machines, they provided us with fast feedback and productive workflows that are hard to compete with.

Re-ops is a Clojure based project that aims to bring fast rapid REPL-ized sessions back to the forefront of operations, from remote operations to VM automation and distributed data collection, its composed from:

* Re-mote, REPL for controlling remote operations on hosts.
* Re-core, REPL for automating the management of remote VMs
* Re-gent, an agent that enables invocation of distributed Clojure functions.
* Re-conf, configuration managment recipes in Clojurescript

In the talk we will cover:

* Re-ops Main components and what they offer.
* How Clojure simplifies operations on scale.
* The Reload workflow.
* Pipeline and protocols patterns.

venetiabird

Venetia Bird

Venetia Bird

Venetia is a developer at REA Group.

GOING SERVERLESS

Recently one of the teams at REA launched a recommendation engine which was built using AWS Serverless technology. The journey of implementing this solution turned out to be an interesting one on a number of levels. With any new technology or pattern there is always advantages, disadvantages and tradeoffs to consider. There is also a great opportunity to shift our mindset, reset our expectations and forge forward to realise a successful system. Venetia will share REA’s implementation journey, which involved discovering new patterns, staying true to existing patterns, lots of persistence and of course thinking outside the box.

mainguyen

Mai Nguyen

Mai Nguyen

“The power you have is to be the best version of yourself you can be, so you can create a better world” – A favorite quote that makes up Mai’s purpose and career, and to be the best she can, she always does what she loves – coding and sharing knowledge. Mai is a coder who likes to help people work more efficiently using IT. Currently a Software Developer at carsales.com and Industry Workshop Coordinator at Code Like a Girl, Mai spends most of her time devising efficient solutions for customers, taking advantage of all the bleeding edge technologies. And when she is not coding away solutions, you can find her conducting workshops across schools and organizations, promoting Women in Technology via Code Like a Girl and Carsales Go4Tech initiatives.

SOMETIMES HAVING TINY THINGS ARE GOOD TOO

If building monolith is hard for you, microservices are by no means a silver bullet.

Here at Carsales, we experienced first hand the issues with monolithic architecture and made the decision of switching from that haphazardly structured code jungle to “the next big thing” that everyone refers to as microservices. However, the journey is not as simple as a lightweight change that everyone perceives. This talk will explore the issues with monoliths, the pain they cause, approaches to move away from that system, the main challenges we faced, the key technologies used with going distributed, and our experiences in the journey.

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Derek Troy-West

Derek Troy-West

Derek moved to Melbourne from London in 2012, discovering Clojure, distributed systems, and good coffee.

Today he runs a small consultancy that specialises in building Streaming Data Platforms.

STREAMING DATA PLATFORMS & CLOJURE

We take data, transform it, and put it somewhere.

Clojure is a data-first language that harnesses the power of the JVM to excel in a data-intensive world.

If your requirements include high availability, realtime stream processing, linear scalability, or perhaps you just have an unreasonable amount of log data to wrangle then Apache Kafka and Apache Cassandra might be the right tools to adopt.

In this session we will live-code a Streaming Data Platform with Clojure, Kafka, and Cassandra, demonstrating the power of the REPL to explore ideas, and the power of the JVM to deliver a system that scales.

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Jen Smith

Jen Smith

Jen is a long-time developer who’s now done the circuit from web development to working with data at scale, infrastructure and back round to web development again. Overcomplicated system architectures and code make her grumpy. Elegant systems, pure functions and coffee make her less grumpy.

SERVERLESS ARCHITECTURES: LET’S TAKE THINGS FURTHER

A plethora of platforms and technologies, including AWS Lambda, Heroku and, of course, the eponymous Serverless framework all allow you to build and run software ‘without worrying about servers’.

In this talk, I will describe some of the characteristics and goals that fall under the ‘serverless’ banner and how they lead to awesome and stable systems.

I will also share with you some of the ways I think we can push these concepts further and how I’ve applied these in building out web systems in the recent past.

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Kendra Vant

Kendra Vant

A firm conviction not to die wondering ‘what if?’ has given Kendra Vant a rich and varied career working with memorable people, companies and universities across New Zealand, Australia, the US and Malaysia. Through it all, her greatest satisfaction has come from working with smart people to solve difficult problems.

After doctoral research in experimental quantum physics at MIT and postdoctoral work in applied quantum computing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Kendra was serendipitously placed to ride the tsunami of corporate interest in applying machine learning to create personalised experiences in an increasingly connected and digital world.

She has worked in insurance, banking, telecommunications, government, gaming and the airline industry and is currently Principal Data Scientist with Seek Asia Pacific and Americas, applying emerging techniques in natural language processing and deep learning to the problem of finding other people their dream job.

A DEVELOPERS GUIDE TO THE MACHINE LEARNING AND AI UNIVERSE

We will break down the terminology of the ML and AI world, discuss how data science techniques differ from algorithmic development of software engineering, investigate the ecosystem of software needed to support ML/AI in production and do a whistle stop tour of emerging AI techniques including Deep Learning and Reinforcement Learning.

holdenkarau

Holden Karau

Holden Karau

Holden is a transgender Canadian open source developer advocate with a focus on Apache Spark, BEAM, and related “big data” tools. She is the co-author of Learning Spark, High Performance Spark, and another Spark book that’s a bit more out of date. She is a commiter on and PMC member on Apache Spark and committer on SystemML & Mahout projects. Prior to joining Google as a Developer Advocate she worked at IBM, Alpine, Databricks, Google (yes this is her second time), Foursquare, and Amazon. When not in San Francisco, Holden speaks internationally about different big data technologies (mostly Spark). She was tricked into the world of big data while trying to improve search and recommendation systems and has long since forgotten her original goal. Outside of work she enjoys playing with fire, riding scooters, and dancing.

END TO END ML: SCALING WITH BIG & TINY DATA (+ DEEP LEARNING OF COURSE WITH SPARK & BEAM)

Apache Spark is one of the most popular big data systems, and has a built in machine learning API. However, Spark largely leaves open the question how to use our models outside of the batch world (like in a reactive application). Apache BEAM is relatively new on the scene, and has interesting support for tf.transform. Different options exist for persisting the results and using them for live training, and we will explore the tradeoffs of the different formats and their corresponding serving/prediction layers. From there we choose two formats and illustrate how to build an auto-scaling reactive serving layer.

Just building an end-to-end pipeline like this isn’t enough to be able to take your model to production, so we will wrap up with important pointers for things like updating models, validation, and other little details that often get overlooked since they don’t fit nicely on a slide with a cat picture (not that we won’t try). Time permitting we’ll talk about designing clients for graceful degradation when everything eventually catches on fire.

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Chad Harris

Chad Harris

Chad Harris is a lead developer at Verrency

KAFKA STREAMS IN ACTION

In this talk, I’ll cover the basic concepts behind Kafka streams and streaming applications and then dive into the deployment models and live demonstrations of using the Kafka Streams API on the JVM to develop real time stream processors.

Kafka Streams enables us to distribute our computation (think real time spending calculations for example) in a predictable, fault tolerant manner. This talk will introduce Kafka Streams and show attendees understand how to map practical data problems to stream processing topologies and how to process those streams at scale. This covers streaming concepts such as aggregation, joining and ‘windowing’.

I’ll also show how real-time streams can become the source of data (ETL) into systems like Hadoop / RedShift / Relational or other data stores with an example of loading data into a Cassandra database.

Attendees will learn:

Attendees will gain an understanding of how to use the low level Kafka Streams API on the JVM and and gain an understanding of the deployment architecture and requirements for Kafka, including the local storage requirements for stream processors, and how streams data is replicated across Kafka clusters for scalability and fault tolerance.

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Yaniv Rodenski

Yaniv Rodenski

Yaniv Rodenski is a software developer, a speaker, an author, a Jedi and all around nerd. Yaniv has been developing software as a hobby from a young age, and professionally since 1997. He is the co-author of “Pro Couchbase Server” (Apress) and specializes in Big Data, NoSQL, and distributed systems. Yaniv is also the creator of Apache Amaterasu (incubating) and co-founder of Voxxed days Melbourne

START TREATING YOUR DATA PIPELINES AS ACTUAL SOFTWARE WITH APACHE AMATERASU (INCUBATING)

In recent years, the DevOps movement has introduced groundbreaking approaches to the way we manage the lifecycle of software development and deployment. Today organizations aspire to fully automate the deployment of microservices and web applications with tools such as Chef, Puppet, and Ansible. However, the deployment of data-processing pipelines remains a relic from the dark ages of software development.

Processing large-scale data pipelines is the main engineering task of the Big Data era, and it should be treated with the same respect and craftsmanship as any other piece of software. That is why we created Apache Amaterasu (Incubating) – an open source framework that takes care of the specific needs of Big Data applications in the world of continuous delivery.

In this session, we will take a close look at Apache Amaterasu (Incubating) a simple and powerful framework to configure and dispense data pipelines. Amaterasu aims to help data engineers and data scientists to compose, configure, test, package, deploy and execute data pipelines written using multiple tools, languages, and frameworks.
We will see what Amaterasu provides today, and how it can help existing Big Data application and demo some of the new bits that are coming in the near future.

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Eric Sedlar

Eric Sedlar

As VP & Technical Director of Oracle Labs, manages a team of close to 200 researchers and engineers worldwide. In his tenure in the Labs, Eric has started a number of long-term system research projects that have led to technology transfer into products, including the GraalVM programming language runtime, PGX Parallel Graph Analytics, and the Parfait tool for Program Analysis. His personal research interests have been in the field of data processing and the intersection with compiler technologies. Eric was the co-author of the SIGMOD Best Paper in 2009 and has been an inventor on 85 granted patents.

LANGUAGE-LEVEL VIRTUALIZATION WITH GRAALVM

Virtualization has been in search of the elusive goal of “write once, run anywhere” (as well as multitenant isolation). The JavaVM provides processor virtualization–it allows you to run your program on any processor. Virtual machines like Xen or VirtualBox provide OS virtualization–they allow you to run your program on any operating system. However, if you write a library in one language, you are typically out of luck if you want to make it available in other language runtimes, and those language runtimes are generally standalone, and not available in other kinds of engines like databases. GraalVM provides “language-level virtualization” and can run code in any language (simultaneously) with zero costs to cross the language boundary (and can in fact inline across language boundaries). GraalVM is also designed to be embedded in other engines or small devices, and we have demonstrated it running embedded in the Oracle RDBMS, MySQL and NGINX. This talk will demonstrate how GraalVM can run any code in any engine.

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Meera Vasudevan

Meera Vasudevan

Meera is a developer at REA Group, always on the lookout for learning challenges. Since completing her PhD on energy optimisation of data centres, she joined REA’s grad program where she had the opportunity to work on web, mobile development and backend systems. Her interests lie in exploring and rethinking software design principles and sharing that knowledge.

NAVIGATING THE FP WORLD

Have you had monands explained to you by 5 different people in 5 different ways but you still don’t get it? No matter how many video tutorials or books I referred, it is still quite hard to think functionally. Worse, I would finally understand what monads are but still hit a road-block when I try implementing them.

How could I truly understand and use FP? First, I read every book on FP I could get my hands on. Second, I attended every discussion and meetup even remotely related to FP. Third, I started writing functional code for my company. That last one was wishful thinking and a fast route to feeling disheartened.

Learning FP should be fun and I was able to do this by building mini projects or games around the concepts I was learning. I played around with all those fancy functors and applicatives I read about. Granted it was slow going and it means I couldn’t jump straight into writing production code. However, this method helped prevent the sobbing and pulling-your-hair-out stage of learning FP.

This talk discusses my FP learning adventures as a grad developer with the help of a highly active FP community in REA. It will also demystify some functional concepts. Further, it touches upon some quirks and ah-ha! moments that makes me appreciate writing functional code.

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Daniel Chambers

Daniel Chambers

Daniel has a passion for functional programming and quality software. During the day, you can find him writing Haskell and for the .NET platform with F# and C#. He works as a Senior Consultant for Readify.

In his spare time, Daniel is an avid video gamer, science fiction book reader and a heavy sleeper. 🙂

HASKELL – A PEEK INSIDE THE IVORY TOWER

Functional programming is becoming more and more popular and is starting to penetrate mainstream software development. You may have already used languages and libraries that support a functional programming style. But one language stands out as the epitome of functional programming: Haskell. What is it about Haskell that makes it a pure functional programming language? What features does it provide that can help us write quality, maintainable software? How can Haskell give us the confidence to safely refactor and change our software over time?

In this talk we’ll take a tour around the Haskell language and see what makes Haskell an all-in functional programming language. We’ll look at both Haskell’s strengths and its weaknesses. We’ll look at what sets coding in Haskell apart from coding in languages like F#, or coding FP-style in languages like JavaScript. We’ll also dispel the myth that Haskell is not suitable for “normal” software. By the end of the talk, your peek inside Haskell’s ivory tower will hopefully entice you to explore its potential further.

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Sven Ruppert

Sven Ruppert

Sven Ruppert has been coding Java since 1996 and Developer Advocate for Vaadin. In his free time he is regularly speaking at Conferences like JavaOne/Jfokus/Devoxx/JavaZone/JavaLand and many more and contributes to IT periodicals, as well as tech portals.

FUNCTIONAL – REACTIVE WITH CORE JAVA

There are a lot of reactive frameworks in the field, some with functional languages for the JVM. But Java9 give you both. But how you could combine this and use this without adding the next big framework to your project? We will have a Core Java journey to explore a lot of nice possibilities based on the the JDK.

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Phil Nash

Phil Nash

Phil is a developer evangelist for Twilio and a Google Developer Expert. He’s been in the web industry for 10 years building with JavaScript, Ruby and Swift. He can be found hanging out at meetups and conferences, playing with new technologies and APIs or writing open source code online. Sometimes he makes his own beer, but he’s more likely to be found discovering new ones around the world.

AGGRESSIVE WEB APPS

Push notifications on the web can be a force for good, but is that how they are coming across? We’ll take a look at how push notifications permissions are being implemented and how we can do it better. We’ll then look at the notifications themselves, find out what the best kind of notifications are and how not to wind up with your app’s, or the entire web’s, notifications blocked forever.

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Wilson Mendes

Wilson Mendes

GDE (Google Developer Expert) Angular, GDG Salvador organizer, passionate about technology and active in communities with a focus on web development, including AngularJS, JavaScript, HTML5, CSS3, Workflow, web performance, security and Internet of things.

Participates in events organization, speaker at conferences in Brazil and other countries and contributes to few open source projects.

MICRO FRONTEND: A MICROSERVICE ARCHITECTURE FROM YOUR FRONTEND WEB APPS

Are you working with a big Frontend application and you are facing some problems in your project? Do you want migrate your frontend from another framework or library and don’t know how? Don’t you know how to manage different layers of complexity in your application or share these components between applications?

In this talk, I will share my experience and decisions creating micro frontend applications, how to manage quality, deployment and more that makes your team deliver more valuable features giving you the power to migrate, improve, evolve and experiment in your product.

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Stacey Fernandes

Stacey Fernandes

I am a Software Developer from REA and I currently help build web applications.

BUILD YOUR FIRST REACT APP

React is quite the web development buzz word so if you have no React experience but heard of React, this talk is to help you understand the fundamentals of React.js and the problems it solves when developing modern web applications for rich interactive user experience. We will go through the fundamentals by creating a simple hello world example, then along the way cover things like props, components and state… Let’s get started with your very own Hello World react app.

yaseradelmehraban

Yaser Adel Mehraban

Yaser Adel Mehraban

This man whose name only looks hard to say, is a creative web dev, consultant, blogger, hiker and father. He is a puppet master of code, bending the backend code to his will in elegant and ingenious fashion.

He is a “die hard” fan but don’t hold this against him because, well, he is still a team player and, umm, poutine.

GET YOUR PWA READY WITH VUEJS IN NO TIME

Everybody is talking about progressive web applications AKA PWA these days and most of the major companies like twitter are already there.

However when it comes to decide what language to choose for developing such an application there are a lot of choices and it becomes a cumbersome task to make a final decision.

In this talk we will cover the basics of how to get a progressive web application written in VueJS up and running in a short time and the benefit of having your PWA on a solid framework.

joshlong

Josh Long

rod-johnson

Rod Johnson

Josh Long & Rod Johnson

Josh Long is the Spring Developer Advocate at Pivotal. Josh is a Java Champion, author of 5 books (including O’Reilly’s upcoming “Cloud Native Java: Designing Resilient Systems with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud, and Cloud Foundry”) and 3 best-selling video trainings (including “Building Microservices with Spring Boot Livelessons” w/ Phil Webb), and an open-source contributor (Spring Boot, Spring Integration, Spring Cloud, Activiti and Vaadin)

Rod Johnson is CEO of Atomist, the development automation copany. He created Java’s Spring Framework and was co-founder and CEO of SpringSource. Following the acquisition of SpringSource by VMware, he served as SVP, Application Platform at VMware. He still writes lots of code, currently in Scala and TypeScript.

Rod is the author of several popular and influential books on Java and Java EE, including “Expert One-on-One J2EE Design and Development” and “J2EE without EJB” (with Juergen Hoeller). He is on the board of several prominent open source companies: Neo Technology, elastic, Meteor and Hazelcast.

BOOTIFUL SOFTWARE DELIVERY WITH ATOMIST AND SPRING BOOT

The journey from concept to customer is long and no single leg of the journey is more important than any other, yet we software engineers tend to focus on the development of the code, and ignore the larger technical and business context of software delivery. Just as the shoemakers’ children go barefoot, we fail to improve and automate the daily work of our own teams. As we’ve moved toward microservices from monoliths, we’ve actually gone backwards in some ways, as the sophisticated capabilities of IDEs solve fewer of the problems of managing larger, possibly polyglot, and distributed systems. There are a lot of questions we need to confront beyond the the choice of development framework (Spring Boot, of course!):

– What’s the next breakthrough beyond CI/CD?
– How do we build software that’s optimized for delivery?
– What would an API for software maintenance look like?
– What it means to increase your level of automation from ad hoc, through automated to automatic
– What it means to increase your level of visibility from hidden on someone’s machine, through visible to auditable
– How to change delivery across all projects through a single change
– How ChatOps can supercharge team collaboration

Join us, Atomist CEO and Spring Framework founder Rod Johnson (@SpringRod) and Spring Developer Advocate Josh Long (@starbuxman), and we’ll look at building better software quickly and more safely, while optimizing for the long tail of maintenance, with Spring Boot and Atomist.

guy

Guy Peleg

Guy Peleg

Guy Moved to Melbourne in September to join MYOB, He Graduated B.SC in Software Engineering at 2014. but he is programming since he was 12. Guy Worked in several big companies in Israel, Designed and Lead projects for Big Entreprises. In the past year his main goal is to make Software more Reliable, Scalable and Resilience. Guy Have a vast Knowledge in Java and in particular in Architecture.

ADOPTING THE REACTIVE WAY

Startups often need to compete with more established companies by offering add value via features and innovation in the way which they operate. But what happens when the biggest value you can add is performance and resilience?
In the last few years, I was working for a cybersecurity startup that had to reinvent its internal architecture to achieve high scalability with Firewalls and other 3rd parties Vendors

The solution was moving to the Reactive way that enabled us to avoid poor being dragged into poor performance due to 3rd party thus getting to the with high advantage

In this session, I will be sharing my journey migrating a legacy codebase and changing the mindset to think, write and understand the reactive way. I will talk about the wins and struggles myself and the team went through, from the manifesto to design patterns we used and how it influenced our products.

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